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Articles About Storytelling

Tips for Telling Funny-Scary Campfire Ghost Stories
By: Priscilla Howe

PRISCILLA HOWE: The Ghost With The One Black EyeNight has fallen. The campfire flickers and pops, coals glow, listeners creep closer to the fire and the storyteller. It’s time for scary stories. But wait…some of the listeners are too small for the stories of La Llorona or Hookman. It’s time for a funny-scary campfire story, just enough for shivers, not enough for nightmares. Here are a few tips for effective campfire storytelling for the youngest listeners.

1. Notice the body language of the listeners as you introduce the story. Suggest that the smallest children sit with an older sibling or adult. Some small children like very scary stories, but it’s kinder to the adults who have to be with the child later on to tell gentler stories to young children.

2. Let the listeners know right away that this will be a funny-scary story, not a scary-scary story.

3. Choose a story with a joke ending. You can find a few of these in Alvin Schwartz’ Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark series, in Simon Bronner’s American Children’s Folklore, or ask a ten-year-old who has been to camp.

4. Err on the side of goofy characters, not scary, for young listeners. Build in a hand movement or repetitive phrase so the audience can join in.

5. Sometimes even a funny story can scare a small child. Reassure the individual child that it will all be fine in the end.

6. For a little shiver, pause just before the punchline. This builds suspense and creates an even bigger laugh at the funny ending.

7. Don’t be surprised if children say “That wasn’t scary!” at the end. This is most likely not a true critique, just an observation.

Once the little ones have gone off to bed, and you’re sure that those who are still around the fire can handle it, if you have time and inclination, tell the truly scary stories.

******
As a full-time professional storyteller, Priscilla Howe tells all kinds of stories: funny, scary, funny-scary, and more. With some 200+ peformances per year all over the world, she’s an expert in storytelling for children. Check out her stories, including The Ghost with the One Black Eye at http://priscillahowe.com .


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Author Information:
Name: Priscilla Howe
Website: http://www.storyteller.net/tellers/phowe
The contents expressed in any article on Storyteller.net are solely the opinion of author.


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